Animators' drawings done by legendary Disney animator, Paul Carlson.

Suite of 19 drawings representative of some of the most classic moments in Animation history.

Paul Carlson began working on Disney's Lady and the Tramp in 1954 as an in betweener and advanced to assistant animator by 1959.


During this time he also illustrated six How to Draw books for Disney. Paul did work with UPA, Quartet Films and Chuck Jones Productions throughout the 1960s. After incorporating as Paul Carlson Cartoons he did Disney film strips, science and flight instruction films and over one hundred TV commercials featuring Mr. Magoo as a spokesman for various products.


Since 1998 Paul has been giving cartoon drawing lessons at art schools and galleries throughout the United States and Australia.

 


Alice, from “Alice in Wonderland” (1951).
Based on a combination of Lewis Carroll’s “Alice” books, "Alice in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking Glass”.
It is the 13th animated feature in the Disney animated features canon.
Made under the supervision of Walt Disney himself, often regarded as some of the finest work in Disney studio history.
Received an academy Award nomination for Best Original Score.

Bambi, from “Bambi” (1942).
Based on the 1923 book “Bambi, A Life in the Woods” by Felix Salten.
This was Walt Disney’s favorite film.
It is the 5th animated feature in the Disney animated features canon.
Disney animators spent a year studying and drawing deer and fawns to perfect the look of Bambi and his parents and friends.
Nominated for three Academy Awards: Best Sound, Best Song and Original Music Score

Chip ‘n’ Dale (1943).
Made their first appearance in the cartoon “Private Pluto” where they antagonized Pluto the dog.
Chip 'n Dale did not get their names until the cartoon Chip 'n' Dale (1947) where they antagonize Donald Duck.
In 1989, Chip and Dale were chosen to be the title characters in a new animated series, Chip ‘n’ Dale Rescue Rangers in which they form a detective agency and help the less fortunate.

Cinderella & The Prince, from “Cinderella” (1950).
This is the 12th animated feature in the Disney animated features canon.
It was adapted from the fairy tale “Cinderella”, drawing primarily from the version by Charles Perrault.
The transformation of Cinderella's torn dress to that of the white ball gown was considered to be Walt Disney’s favorite piece of animation.
This film received 3 Academy Awards nominations for Best Song, Best Sound and Original Music Score.

Jiminy Cricket, from “Pinocchio” (1940)
Pinocchio is Disney’s 2nd animated feature in the Disney animated features canon; and it’s based on the book “Pinocchio: Tale of a Puppet” by Carlo Collodi.
Originally the cricket wasn't even in the film but, after numerous characters, many of which came from the original novel, were used in the early draft; producer Walt Disney was displeased with the work and called a halt to the project so the concept could be rethought and the characters redesigned. And Jiminy Cricket was developed and became central to the story.
Won 2 Academy Awards for Best Song and Best Scoring of a Musical Picture.

Dumbo, from “Dumbo” (1941)
It’s the 4th film in the Disney animated features canon.
Based upon a child's book of the same name by Helen Aberson
Dumbo won the 1941 Academy Award for Original Music Score and was also nominated for Best Song.
It also won Best Animation Design at the 1947 Cannes Film Festival.
Cels for Dumbo are the rarest in the industry, the gray paint (used for so many of the elephant skins)
would "pop" when the cel was flexed. Many irreplaceable cels were destroyed this way.

“Lady & The Tramp” (1955).
It’s the 15th film in the Disney animated features canon.
This is considered the first fully-original Disney animated story.
It’s the first widescreen animated film.

Mickey & Minnie Mouse (circa 1940).
Mickey and Minnie debuted in the cartoon short Plane Crazy (1928) which was the first Mickey cartoon produced.
The next film featuring them was The Gallopin’ Gaucho (1928).
They appear together again in Steamboat Willie (1928).

Mickey at The Piano, from “Orphan’s Benefit” (1934).
This short, marks Donald Duck’s first appearance with Mickey Mouse.
Goofy first used his name correctly in this cartoon.
The cartoon was redone in 1941 in color and with the character models updated.

Mickey and Pluto Golfing, from “Canine Caddy” (1940)
Pluto is an animated cartoon character made famous in a series of Disney short cartoons.
He has most frequently appeared as Mickey Mouse's pet dog.
He also had an independent starring role in a number of Disney shorts in the 1940s and 1950s.
Pluto’s first appearance was in The Chain Gang, 1930.

Peter Pan and Tinker Bell, from “Peter Pan” (1953).
It’s the 14th film in the Disney animated features canon.
The film's story is based on the play Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up by J. M. Barrie.
When Walt Disney was a child, he played Peter Pan in a school function.

“The Three Little Pigs” (1933).
One of Disney’s most successful animated short films.
Three Little Pigs won the 1934 Academy Award for Best Short Subject: Cartoons.
Though cartoon shorts usually lasted very brief periods of time, this one played in many theaters longer than most feature films.

“Pinocchio” (1940).
Pinocchio is Disney’s 2nd animated feature in the Disney animated features canon;
and it’s based on the book Pinocchio: Tale of a Puppet by Carlo Collodi.
Won 2 Academy Awards for Best Song and Best Scoring of a Musical Picture.
Originally, Pinocchio looked exactly like a real wooden puppet.
But Walt found that no one could really sympathize with such a character and so
the designers had to redesign the puppet as much as possible.
Eventually, they revised the puppet to make him look more like a real boy.

“Winnie the Pooh” (circa 1970’s).
Winnie the Pooh is a fictional bear created by A.A. Milne and E.H. Shepard.
The Pooh stories have been translated into many languages.
Milne named the character Winnie-the-Pooh after a teddy bear owned by his son,
Christopher Robin Milne, who was the basis for the character Christopher Robin.
His toys also lent their names to most of the other characters,
except for the Gopher character, who was added in the Disney version.

Snow White, from “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” (1937).
This is the first full length animated film produced by Walt Disney and one of the first worldwide.
Based in the fairy tale recorded by the Brothers Grimm.
Walt Disney won an honorary Academy Award for this movie.
This movie was also nominated for Best Musical Score.

 

Mickey as The Sorcerer’s Apprentice, from “Fantasia” (1940).
The Sorcerer’s Apprentice is a segment from “Fantasia” which is the 3rd film in the Disney animated features canon.
The animators secretly modeled elements of the Sorcerer in "The Sorcerer's Apprentice"
on their boss, Walt Disney. The raised eyebrow was regarded as a dead giveaway.

Mickey Mouse, from “Steamboat Willie” (1928).
This was the second Mickey Mouse cartoon to be released, after Plane Crazy; and the first with sound.
Was released in July 1928 with no sound; and re-released in November of that year with sound.
The film has been selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry.

Tigger & Rabbit, from “Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too!” (1974).
This is the 3rd Winnie the Pooh short produced by Disney.
It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film.

 

Tinker Bell, from “Peter Pan” (1953).
It’s the 14th film in the Disney animated features canon.
When Walt Disney was a child, he played Peter Pan in a school function.
This was one of the first times that Tinker Bell was shown as an actual fairy and not simply a beam of light.